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Alamosaurus sanjuanensis by vasix Alamosaurus sanjuanensis by vasix
Alamosaurus is perhaps the coolest sauropod ever in my opinion-and like all, is all things, at a state of alteration. I have seen reconstructions of Alamosaurus with a rather nondescript look and a curvy neck and Alamosaurus that don't even look like Alamosaurus among all things. This is an upload with Sta.sh, so I feel happy too :)!

So Alamosaurus is from the Kirtland Formation and also the North Horn Formation of Utah, from the Early Maastrichtian to the late Maastrichtian (73 to 69 or 68 million years ago, apparently, I think), late enough to be in the southern range of T. rex. In fact, apparently, some of the southern Tyrannosaurus population, might even might have been locally specialized as pack hunters with these titans around them.


New research suggests that this genus was the largest sauropod and therefore the largest dinosaur, of North America. It is an advanced titanosaur, a saltasaur-hence the armor on the neck and back-but with high shoulders and a large neck. This creature is a rival to the other giants like Puertasaurus and Argentinosaurus from South America among its relative. I stole the skeletal I used from :iconshartman:, the king of DA's skeletals.
I might have botched this neck and back structure up though.....wiks! Anyhow, the darker individuals are all females while the big one with the blue face is a male in the mood for some mischief.....:iconhotplz: ? Teeheehee!!


Its contemporary genera from the Kirtland include Pentaceratops, Nodocephalosaurus, Parasaurolophus, Kritosaurus, (Naashoibitosaurus, Anasazisaurus and others), Bistahieversor, Sauronitholestes, and those New Mexican dinosaurs).
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:icondeannclark:
DeanNClark Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Creative style, great work!
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:) Thanks a lot!!!
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:icondeannclark:
DeanNClark Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
You're welcome. :)
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:)
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:icondeannclark:
DeanNClark Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
:)
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:iconwoohplz:
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Interesting concept.... I like it, very intense background and "down to business" color scheme. Posture and colors remind me a lot of my Argyrosaurus reconstruction... other than the spines.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ah, why thanks! Spiky sauropodomorphs in general are something I love a lot. Thanksss!!!!! :) Although I crosschecked :shartman:'s restoration again and I have gotten the tail a little too short.....the tail looks whiplike at the end so considering that this is a titanosaur, a macronarian.....so.....whip-ish tail end? Just doubting myself....:?:
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Alamosaurus appears to have had a whip-end, but this feature is mostly in very derived titanosaur groups like saltasaurs and nemegtosaurs. Argyrosaurus may not have had it. But Alamosaurus most likely did. The whip-end is thicker and not as elongated as in diplodocids. It was probably more heavily muscled as well. I would NOT expect to see whip-tails in more basal macronarian groups (like for example Euhelopodids, Huanghetitanids, or Acrofornicans).
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for that....so then my ref was correct after all....just didn't guess that....but what're Acrofornicans? Never heard of those.....
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Acrofornicans (or "high-arched" sauropods) are a transitional group of titanosauriforms, more derived than Huanghetitanids and Euhelopodids, but more basal than true titanosaurs. Acrofornicans are a new group and not very well-understood, but they do all share some basic features, particularly their very (no, ridiculously) tall neural arches on the dorsal vertebrae, with pneumatic complexity rivaling a gothic cathedral, but often with only a short stub of a neural spine on top. They also generally have dorsal centra that are short in height relative to the rest of the vertebra. They all have very deep hyposphenes. Acrofornicans include Phuwiangosaurus, Baotianmansaurus, and probably Sonidosaurus.

The closest known relatives of this group (besides the Euhelopodids) appear to be Dongyangosaurus, Ligabuesaurus, and Tastavinsaurus. Not that they're all that closely related to the Acrofornicans, but for now they're the closest we've got.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Wow, so Phuwiangosaurus has been finally set into a good classification has it, now? in one rather recent-ish book I have, includes Phuwiangosaurus as a titanosaurid.....so anyhow, one would expect, say....long, Euhelopus-ish necks on these as well?If the neural spines are so short, then the back must've been very low, then?
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Phuwiangosaurus is not quite a titanosaurian (the term "titanosaurid" is outdated because titanosaurs are not seen as a "superfamily" rather than just a family), but it is VERY close.

The Acrofornicans are basically one or two steps removed from true titanosaurs. They probably did have long, Euhelopus-like necks seeing as their dorsal vertebrae also show a lot of similarities to Euhelopus, just with more extreme neural arches. The skull of Phuwiangosaurus (as much of it as is known) shows a snout roughly similar to Euhelopus. The short neural spines means that the spine of the animal's back was low, but the arches were extremely high, so overall the "back" would not appear low, and the torso was probably pretty deep.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, although my book's Phuwiangosaurus has a reconstruction with a rather narrow-looking skull, and the neck is enormously long, like that of a Mamenchisaurus, perhaps, but at the wrong angle. Wow, I really heard of the Acrofornicans for the first time today! Titanosaurs and other macronarians are undergoing major revisions so that's good to hear. :)
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(1 Reply)
:iconksdinoboy95:
ksdinoboy95 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2011
as usuall I allways do and allways will love your work!I would love to have your permission to us some in my storylines?iether way I will allways be a fan my friend~
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Use everything if you wish, I'm open wide! :XD:
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:iconnesihonsu:
Nesihonsu Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice perspective, wonder what they are looking at :D
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
@ you and me....:)
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November 16, 2011
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